Boulder County’s Latino Migrant Housing: 1920s-1960s

In this lesson students will examine Boulder Latino migrant housing as portrayed in three different primary sources. In this process, students will closely read an oral history, a typed interview, and an oral interview for details related to this housing. Details and specific word choices related to tone and mood will be captured in a note catcher. Finally, students will be asked to choose between two topics and construct an evidenced-based essay.

Created By: Patty Hagan, SVVSD Office of Professional Development

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Civil Rights Movement in Colorado – Latinos and Education: A Socratic Seminar

This lesson challenges students to view Civil Rights as a continuing process for marginalized groups. In particular, we will focus on Latinos in the Colorado educational system during the Civil Rights movement. When addressing the Civil Rights movement in American History, many students think of the courageous work done by African-Americans and other allied groups in the Southern United States (especially if they have taken a Civil Rights unit). This lesson expands their understanding to include Latinos. Students end the lesson by identifying other groups who may still be struggling with equal access to Civil Rights in American society, as focused on education.

Created By: Michael Codrey, New Vista High School

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Civil Rights Movement in Colorado- Latinos and Education: A Socratic Seminar

In this lesson students are challenged to view Civil Rights as a continuing process for marginalized groups. In particular, we will focus on Latinos in the Colorado educational system during the Civil Rights movement. When addressing the Civil Rights movement in American History, many students think of the courageous work done by African-Americans and other allied groups in the Southern United States (especially if they have taken a Civil Rights unit). This lesson expands their understanding to include Latinos. Students end the lesson by identifying other groups who may still be struggling with equal access to Civil Rights in American society, as focused on education.

Created By: Michael Codrey, New Vista High School

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Claim Your Identity: Create Your Own Acronym, in Health, History, or English Language Arts Course

In this lesson, students will design an acronym for their ideal label or “check box”. The lesson emphasises emotional wellness through diversity. Students will use primary sources from the Boulder County History Project primary resources site (good examples are: Dalia Sanchez, Jason Romero Jr., and Kelly Sarceno) or the New York Times video op-ed site (good examples are: “A conversation with Latinos on race” or “A conversation with Asian-Americans on race”) and the attached worksheet to create their acronym. A historical view can be explored through the BCLHP primary resource set, Creating an Inclusive Chicano Identity.

Created By: Rebecca Freeman, Longmont High School

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Comparing the 1980 Shootings in Longmont with Michael Brown/Ferguson

In this lesson students will use the materials from BCLHP focused on the Longmont Shootings in the 1980s and the creation of the Kensington Park Mural, Unity, and draw connections between events in Ferguson, MO / Michael Brown. Students will create a mural reflective of themes, symbols, and ideas in Unity but apply these to Michael Brown. Students may write a short paragraph or essay explaining the connections between the two murals and/or give an oral presentation.

Created By: Cara Luchies-Schroeder, Skyline High School 

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Connecting to the Concept of Identity in Literature and Local Latino Lives

In this lesson students make personal connections to the concept of identity and the potential effects of external forces on identity, prior to transferring their analysis skills to interpreting the concept of identity as seen in literature. (The latter is not described in this lesson plans). Students will examine some of the various ways people identify […]

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Connecting to the Concept of Identity in Literature and Local Latino Lives

In this lesson students make personal connections to the concept of identity and the potential effects of external forces on identity, prior to transferring their analysis skills to interpreting the concept of identity as seen in literature. (The latter is not described in this lesson plans). Students will examine some of the various ways people identify themselves and the influences upon their identities, culminating in a personal reflective essay.

Created By: Vanessa Dimiziani-Cascio, New Vista High School

 

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Creating Found Poetry: Exploring Racism against the Local Latino Community Using Primary Sources

In this lesson students will create “Found Poems” from a primary document that discusses the history of racism against Latino communities of Boulder, Colorado. Individually, students will reframe the text to create a poem with the message they have taken from the piece.
*Note: One foul word is used in this piece, so you may choose to eliminate that part of the story, or have a conversation with students about use of profanity, maturity in dealing with it, and allow them to have it eliminated if they so choose.

Created By: Lucy Copperberg, Twin Peaks Charter Academy

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DBQ – Issues of Race in Boulder County, 1910-1935

In this lesson students will use the DBQ format to explore issues of race in Boulder County from 1910 to 1935. Topic: Race issues between white residents and Mexican migrants in Boulder County were due to existing racial tensions. Assess the validity of this statement as it pertains to the time period 1910-1935. In the 1910s and 1920s, Mexican migrant workers came to Boulder County to work in the fields and in the coal mines. These immigrants maintained their cultural identity by speaking Spanish, keeping their Catholic faith, and holding on to the customs and traditions of the Mexican people. These immigrants faced the challenge of fitting into a society that was decidedly “American,” and was supported by the Ku Klux Klan, an organization committed to the preservation of what they deemed were American ideals.

 

Created By: Martin Clark, Mead High School 

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