Immigration: A Gallery Walk Through Immigration to the U.S., Turn of the 20th Century

In this lesson students will view Newspaper articles, photos, cartoons, and maps displayed at each gallery station bring the period of around 1900 alive for each of 6 immigrant groups that came to the U.S. By using primary and secondary sources, students will be able to see and experience immigration and the immigrant experience and relate it to their own lives. Using a graphic organizer allows students to analyze what they are looking at and be able to sort out important information as well as helping with content comprehension.

By Jennifer Kraemer, Fairview High School

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Labor Strife in Colorado: Comparing the Ludlow Massacre and the Columbine Mine Strike

In this lesson students will get a sense of Industrialization in America in the early 20th century. They will describe similarities and differences between the miners strike in Ludlow Colorado (1914) and the miners strike in Lafayette Colorado (1927). It can also be adapted to the Progressive Era. Students should come away with an understanding of labor, capital, and the emergence of labor unions as forces in American History.
Created By: Michael Codrey, New Vista High School

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Latino Farmworkers Past and Present

In this lesson students compare and contrast Latino farmworkers lives and their artifacts in the past and present using the BCLHP (Boulder County Latino History Project) primary resources.

Students learn about farmworker roles in and contributions to society. Students write a short paragraph about farmworkers, their differences and similarities in the past and present. Students also share an experience of someone they know who is currently a farmworker.

Created By: Alma Fernandez Araujo, Indian Peaks Elementary School 

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Latino History Matters: Making a Podcast

This unit has two overarching goals: first, for students to learn to use primary sources to make an argument about a particular historical event; second, for students to learn more about the history of their community. Students will work in teams of two to three to create a podcast that serves to inform their classmates about a specific aspect of Latino experience in Boulder County during a particular time period. Beyond providing information, the students will focus on using one specific rhetorical appeal (ethos, logos, pathos) in their podcast in a way that will be recognizable to their audience.

  • This lesson can be tweaked for different grade levels and contexts. For instance, the teacher may choose to limit the topic choices in order to make connections to a specific novel/unit of study. Upper-level teachers might choose to incorporate additional rhetorical devices into the project. In other cases, teachers may choose to focus on storytelling instead of argument.

Created By: Jamie Neufeld, Silver Creek High School 

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Life Experiences of Child Migrant Workers

In this lesson students analyze how life experiences shape character, using primary sources from the Boulder County Latino History Project’s primary sources library. The focus is on local Latino Migrant Children. This lesson is part of several designed to be used together or as stand-alone lessons. At the conclusion of the lesson, the student will be able to:

1. Identify at least three examples of how children of migrant workers’ life experiences helped shaped their character,
2. Rank order the life experiences’ impact based on how they would personally react to them,
3. Hypothesize the impact of each of these three life experiences on the child of a migrant worker today.

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Local Goods and Services: Past and Present

In this lesson Students will be able to identify goods and services in their community and then compare community services in Longmont from the past. A special focus is on Latino related businesses. Students learn to understand the function of businesses in the community by studying goods and services both past and present.

Created By: Ana Campos Davila, Indian Peaks Elementary School 

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Migrant Workers: Tools That Sustain

In tis lesson students focus on the farm tools used by migrant workers to tell personal stories. The lesson provides the opportunity for students to learn and appreciate the contributions of migrant workers to our country and how children of the fields learn life lessons. The tools used by migrant workers serve not only to do the manual stoop labor required to provide food for American tables, but also as training tools for lessons that sustain and develop the thirst and hunger for knowledge. Thus grows the drive and determination to not only survive, but succeed. The lesson can also be used to highlight local Latino migrant contributions to the U.S. food industry. Extensions offer the opportunity for research into family agricultural/migrant history or other topics of student interest.

Created By: Maria B. Ramirez, Angevine Middle School

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Muckrakers and Meatpackers – Progressive Era and Today: Comparing Worker Experiences

In this lesson students will reflect on workers’ rights, food safety, and the immigrant experience during the Progressive Era. Students will use primary source documents to examine working conditions for Latino workers in Longmont in the 1970s and compare that to conditions described in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. Students will theorize that there were limitations on these Progressive reforms due to geography, race, and immigration status.
Created By: Deann Bucher, Monarch High School

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