4th Grade Colorado History: Integrating Boulder County Latino History

In this lesson students will look through the lens of different perspectives of Latinos, Anglos, Native Americans, etc. These lessons focus on local Boulder County Latino History and can be integrated with other lessons. Therefore this unit is ongoing throughout the school year. We want students to build empathy and develop cultural sensitivity and awareness for themselves and others in order to build a greater understanding of what took place in this area. Students will describe interactions among people and cultures who have lived and currently live in Colorado. Students will focus on:

  • Who was living in this area of Colorado and what challenges they faced
  • Connecting and comparing/contrasting past events and people with today

Created By: Sharon Trompeter, Emerald Elementary and Jeanette Scotti, Columbine Elementary 

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Exploring Push and Pull Migration Factors: Using Online Mapping Techniques and Primary Sources

In this three-day lesson students will work together in teams to examine historical maps, photographs, and documents. Students explore push and pull factors and how they affect migration patterns. This lesson provides a great introduction for students to use modern technology to analyze primary sources.
Created By: Eitan Fire, Angevine Middle School

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Immigration: A Gallery Walk Through Immigration to the U.S., Turn of the 20th Century

In this lesson students will view Newspaper articles, photos, cartoons, and maps displayed at each gallery station bring the period of around 1900 alive for each of 6 immigrant groups that came to the U.S. By using primary and secondary sources, students will be able to see and experience immigration and the immigrant experience and relate it to their own lives. Using a graphic organizer allows students to analyze what they are looking at and be able to sort out important information as well as helping with content comprehension.

By Jennifer Kraemer, Fairview High School

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Muckrakers and Meatpackers – Progressive Era and Today: Comparing Worker Experiences

In this lesson students will reflect on workers’ rights, food safety, and the immigrant experience during the Progressive Era. Students will use primary source documents to examine working conditions for Latino workers in Longmont in the 1970s and compare that to conditions described in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. Students will theorize that there were limitations on these Progressive reforms due to geography, race, and immigration status.
Created By: Deann Bucher, Monarch High School

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Young Latinos of Boulder County – Exploring the American Dream

In this lesson students will explore issues of identity, discrimination, immigration, language, family, and overcoming challenges as they meet the young Latinos showcased in the Boulder County Latino History Project. By completing group and individual assignments in this mini-unit, students will gain a more complex understanding of the experiences of young Latinos in Boulder County […]

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Exploring Immigration Patterns of Latinos to Boulder County

In this lesson students will research and tell the story behind immigration patterns of Latinos to Boulder County from 1910-1940 using background information, research, BCLHP primary and secondary sources, additional images or video, and Google Tour Builder.

Created By: Patty Sandoval – Angevine Middle School, Lisa Norton – Casey Middle School, Julie Lyddan – Coal Ridge Middle School

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History and Causes of Early 20th Century Local Latino Immigration

In this lesson students analyze specific factors that drive immigration while describing why many Mexicans emigrated to the Longmont area in the early 20th century.
This lesson is part of several designed to be used together or as stand-alone lessons. The other lessons in this set are:

Created By: Travis Whitcomb, Mead Middle School 

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Assimilation and Acculturation: What Does It Mean To Be An American?

In this lesson students will evaluate the term, “What Does It Mean to Be An American?,” and develop an evaluatory conclusion as to the extent, or lack thereof, of acculturation and/or assimilation required to be considered an “American.” Furthermore, students will discuss whether “becoming American” is the “goal” of all ethnic groups (“assimilation” vs. “acculturation”) and evaluate the state of multiculturalism in America today. Students will employ the Michael Walzer article, “What Does It Mean to Be An American?” (1990), primary and secondary source data from the BCLHP, and research from the PEW Research Center, June 2015.

Created By: Chris Barnes, Longmont High School

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