4th Grade Colorado History: Integrating Boulder County Latino History

In this lesson students will look through the lens of different perspectives of Latinos, Anglos, Native Americans, etc. These lessons focus on local Boulder County Latino History and can be integrated with other lessons. Therefore this unit is ongoing throughout the school year. We want students to build empathy and develop cultural sensitivity and awareness for themselves and others in order to build a greater understanding of what took place in this area. Students will describe interactions among people and cultures who have lived and currently live in Colorado. Students will focus on:

  • Who was living in this area of Colorado and what challenges they faced
  • Connecting and comparing/contrasting past events and people with today

Created By: Sharon Trompeter, Emerald Elementary and Jeanette Scotti, Columbine Elementary 

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Migrant Workers: Tools That Sustain

In tis lesson students focus on the farm tools used by migrant workers to tell personal stories. The lesson provides the opportunity for students to learn and appreciate the contributions of migrant workers to our country and how children of the fields learn life lessons. The tools used by migrant workers serve not only to do the manual stoop labor required to provide food for American tables, but also as training tools for lessons that sustain and develop the thirst and hunger for knowledge. Thus grows the drive and determination to not only survive, but succeed. The lesson can also be used to highlight local Latino migrant contributions to the U.S. food industry. Extensions offer the opportunity for research into family agricultural/migrant history or other topics of student interest.

Created By: Maria B. Ramirez, Angevine Middle School

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Exploring Push and Pull Migration Factors: Using Online Mapping Techniques and Primary Sources

In this three-day lesson students will work together in teams to examine historical maps, photographs, and documents. Students explore push and pull factors and how they affect migration patterns. This lesson provides a great introduction for students to use modern technology to analyze primary sources.
Created By: Eitan Fire, Angevine Middle School

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Immigration in the United States: A Collaborative Reasoning, Critical Reading and Debate Experience

In this lesson students will read about the current political arguments in the U.S. to prepare for a Collaborative Reasoning discussion. The Big Discussion Question: Should we make it easier or harder for Mexicans to immigrate to the United States? Students will purposefully read to find reasons on both sides of the immigration issue while taking notes on a T-chart to justify their oral response to the Big Question when engaged in the CR discussion.
Created By: Jennifer Kraemer, Fairview High School

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Immigration: A Gallery Walk Through Immigration to the U.S., Turn of the 20th Century

In this lesson students will view Newspaper articles, photos, cartoons, and maps displayed at each gallery station bring the period of around 1900 alive for each of 6 immigrant groups that came to the U.S. By using primary and secondary sources, students will be able to see and experience immigration and the immigrant experience and relate it to their own lives. Using a graphic organizer allows students to analyze what they are looking at and be able to sort out important information as well as helping with content comprehension.

By Jennifer Kraemer, Fairview High School

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Young Latinos of Boulder County – Exploring the American Dream

In this lesson students will explore issues of identity, discrimination, immigration, language, family, and overcoming challenges as they meet the young Latinos showcased in the Boulder County Latino History Project. By completing group and individual assignments in this mini-unit, students will gain a more complex understanding of the experiences of young Latinos in Boulder County […]

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Exploring Immigration Patterns of Latinos to Boulder County

In this lesson students will research and tell the story behind immigration patterns of Latinos to Boulder County from 1910-1940 using background information, research, BCLHP primary and secondary sources, additional images or video, and Google Tour Builder.

Created By: Patty Sandoval – Angevine Middle School, Lisa Norton – Casey Middle School, Julie Lyddan – Coal Ridge Middle School

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History and Causes of Early 20th Century Local Latino Immigration

In this lesson students analyze specific factors that drive immigration while describing why many Mexicans emigrated to the Longmont area in the early 20th century.
This lesson is part of several designed to be used together or as stand-alone lessons. The other lessons in this set are:

Created By: Travis Whitcomb, Mead Middle School 

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Assimilation and Acculturation: What Does It Mean To Be An American?

In this lesson students will evaluate the term, “What Does It Mean to Be An American?,” and develop an evaluatory conclusion as to the extent, or lack thereof, of acculturation and/or assimilation required to be considered an “American.” Furthermore, students will discuss whether “becoming American” is the “goal” of all ethnic groups (“assimilation” vs. “acculturation”) and evaluate the state of multiculturalism in America today. Students will employ the Michael Walzer article, “What Does It Mean to Be An American?” (1990), primary and secondary source data from the BCLHP, and research from the PEW Research Center, June 2015.

Created By: Chris Barnes, Longmont High School

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DBQ – Latinos and the KKK in Boulder County

In this lesson students use primary sources to explore the role of the KKK in race relations with local Latinos. Topic: To what extent were race issues between white residents and Mexican migrants in Boulder County due to existing racial tensions? In the 1910s and 1920s, Mexican migrant workers came to Boulder County to work in the fields and to work in the coal mines. These immigrants maintained their cultural identity by speaking Spanish, keeping their Catholic faith, and by holding on to the customs and traditions of the Mexican people. These immigrants faced the challenge of fitting into a society that was decidedly “American,” and was supported by the Ku Klux Klan, an organization committed to the preservation of what they deemed were American ideals.

Create By: Martin Clark, Mead High School

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