Exploring Immigration Patterns of Latinos to Boulder County

In this lesson students will research and tell the story behind immigration patterns of Latinos to Boulder County from 1910-1940 using background information, research, BCLHP primary and secondary sources, additional images or video, and Google Tour Builder.

Created By: Patty Sandoval – Angevine Middle School, Lisa Norton – Casey Middle School, Julie Lyddan – Coal Ridge Middle School

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History and Causes of Early 20th Century Local Latino Immigration

In this lesson students analyze specific factors that drive immigration while describing why many Mexicans emigrated to the Longmont area in the early 20th century.
This lesson is part of several designed to be used together or as stand-alone lessons. The other lessons in this set are:

Created By: Travis Whitcomb, Mead Middle School 

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Assimilation and Acculturation: What Does It Mean To Be An American?

In this lesson students will evaluate the term, “What Does It Mean to Be An American?,” and develop an evaluatory conclusion as to the extent, or lack thereof, of acculturation and/or assimilation required to be considered an “American.” Furthermore, students will discuss whether “becoming American” is the “goal” of all ethnic groups (“assimilation” vs. “acculturation”) and evaluate the state of multiculturalism in America today. Students will employ the Michael Walzer article, “What Does It Mean to Be An American?” (1990), primary and secondary source data from the BCLHP, and research from the PEW Research Center, June 2015.

Created By: Chris Barnes, Longmont High School

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DBQ – Latinos and the KKK in Boulder County

In this lesson students use primary sources to explore the role of the KKK in race relations with local Latinos. Topic: To what extent were race issues between white residents and Mexican migrants in Boulder County due to existing racial tensions? In the 1910s and 1920s, Mexican migrant workers came to Boulder County to work in the fields and to work in the coal mines. These immigrants maintained their cultural identity by speaking Spanish, keeping their Catholic faith, and by holding on to the customs and traditions of the Mexican people. These immigrants faced the challenge of fitting into a society that was decidedly “American,” and was supported by the Ku Klux Klan, an organization committed to the preservation of what they deemed were American ideals.

Create By: Martin Clark, Mead High School

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